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Gold Rush: White Water Season 6 - Episode 7 _BEST_


What confused Tim the most about this decision was the fact that the rest of the season has already been paid for. He goes on to say that "in their infinite wisdom after the episode that goes out this Friday [Dec. 30, 2022], they are imposing a 'break' on our episode airing till the new financial year in April!" Strangely, an announcement never came from Discovery itself. This is even more perplexing as the show's ratings have remained fairly high. "This rather short-sighted move will obviously harm that," wrote Tim.




Gold Rush: White Water Season 6 - Episode 7


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"GOLD RUSH: WHITE WATER" SEASON SIX PREMIERES FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11 AT 9PM ET/PT ON DISCOVERY CHANNELLOS ANGELES (October 26, 2022) - Fresh off his biggest gold haul ever, Dustin Hurt is gambling everything for the chance of a life changing payday on this season's "Gold Rush: White Water" premiering on Friday, November 11 at 9 PM ET/PT and streaming on discovery+ the same day. At the start of the season, Dustin was presented with a once in a lifetime opportunity to buy a remote claim, known as "Nugget Creek," with the proven history of delivering gold. Dustin, believing the previous owner had barely scratched the surface of what the land had to offer, scraped together every penny he could find and purchased the claim. Dustin Hurt has gambled everything on gold claims deeper in the Alaskan wilderness than ever before on this season of "Gold Rush: White Water." Hurt and his crew start from scratch and must relocate their entire mining operation across the Chilkat mountains and nine miles up the mighty Tsirku river. They must learn new skills to overcome the hostile terrain and mother nature at her worst. This season could be truly life changing if they can get down to bedrock and their new claim lives up to its legendary name, "Nugget Creek." Viewers can join the conversation on social media by using the hashtag #GoldRush and follow Gold Rush on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for the latest updates."Gold Rush: White Water" is produced for Discovery Channel by Raw Television. About DiscoveryDiscovery Channel is dedicated to creating the highest quality non-fiction content that informs and entertains its consumers about the world in all its wonder, diversity and amazement. The network, which is distributed to 100.8 million U.S. homes, can be seen in 224 countries and territories, offering a signature mix of compelling, high-end production values and vivid cinematography across genres including, science and technology, exploration, adventure, history and in-depth, behind-the-scenes glimpses at the people, places and organizations that shape and share our world. For more information, please visit www.discovery.com.About Warner Bros. DiscoveryWarner Bros. Discovery (NASDAQ: WBD) is a leading global media and entertainment company that creates and distributes the world's most differentiated and complete portfolio of content and brands across television, film and streaming. Available in more than 220 countries and territories and 50 languages, Warner Bros. Discovery inspires, informs and entertains audiences worldwide through its iconic brands and products including: Discovery Channel, discovery+, CNN, DC, Eurosport, HBO, HBO Max, HGTV, Food Network, OWN, Investigation Discovery, TLC, Magnolia Network, TNT, TBS, truTV, Travel Channel, MotorTrend, Animal Planet, Science Channel, Warner Bros. Pictures, Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Games, New Line Cinema, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, Turner Classic Movies, Discovery en Español, Hogar de HGTV and others. For more information, please visit www.wbd.com.


The series drew inspiration from a variety of sources, including the fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons and video games. It was produced using hand-drawn animation; action and dialogue for episodes are decided by storyboarding artists based on rough outlines. Because each episode took roughly eight to nine months to complete, multiple episodes were worked on concurrently. The cast members recorded their lines in group recordings, and the series regularly employed guest actors for minor and recurring characters. Each episode runs for about eleven minutes; pairs of episodes are often telecast to fill half-hour program slots. Cartoon Network announced on September 29, 2016, that the series would conclude in 2018, after the airing of its tenth season. The series finale aired on September 3, 2018. On October 23, 2019, four specials, collectively called Adventure Time: Distant Lands, were announced, which will air exclusively on HBO Max starting with two in 2020.


Cartoon Network asked Ward to submit a sample script for their consideration, but Frederator convinced him to rough out a storyboard instead, as "a board would give a better sense of what was on Pen's mind", according to Frederator's vice president Eric Homan.[19] Ward and his college friends Patrick McHale and Adam Muto (the former of whom served as a writer, storyboard artist, and creative director for the show during its first few seasons, while the latter served as a storyboard artist and creative director for the show before becoming its showrunner) began developing ideas, all the while concentrating on "keep[ing] the good things about the original short [while also] improv[ing] on" them.[19][22] The group's first product was a rough storyboard featuring Finn and Princess Bubblegum going on a spaghetti-supper date.[19] Cartoon Network was not happy with this story, and so Ward, McHale, and Muto created a storyboard for the episode "The Enchiridion!", which was their attempt to consciously emulate the style of the original Nicktoons short. This tactic proved successful, and Cartoon Network approved the first season in September 2008. "The Enchiridion!" was the first episode to enter into production.[19][23][24][25]


Ward and his production team began storyboarding episodes and writing plot outlines, but Cartoon Network was still concerned about the direction of the new series. McHale later recalled that during the pitch of an episode titled "Brothers in Insomnia" (which, for various reasons, was scrapped) the room was filled with executives from Cartoon Network. The pitch went well, but the production staff was soon inundated with questions about the stylistic nature of the series. Around this time, Cartoon Network paused production of the show in an attempt to resolve these creative issues.[26] A number of writers and animators were let go, and in their place, Cartoon Network management hired three veteran animators who had worked on SpongeBob SquarePants: Derek Drymon (who served as executive producer for the first season of Adventure Time), Merriwether Williams (who served as head story editor for the show's first and second seasons), and Nick Jennings (who became the series' long-serving art director).[26][27] Drymon, in particular, played a key role at this time, ensuring that both Cartoon Network and the show's production crew were on the same creative page.[26] Thurop Van Orman, the creator of The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack, was also hired to guide Ward and his staff for the first two seasons.[28] The storyboard for "Prisoners of Love" assuaged many of the fears some Cartoon Network executives had expressed.[29]


For the first four-and-a-half seasons of the show, Ward served as the showrunner for Adventure Time. In an interview with Rolling Stone, Ward revealed that he had stepped down from this role sometime during the fifth season. As a naturally introverted person, he found interacting with and directing people every day to be exhausting. Following Ward's resignation from the post, Adam Muto became the series' new showrunner. Until late 2014, Ward continued to work on the cartoon as a storyboard artist and storyline writer.[35] After November 2014, he stopped regularly contributing to episode outlines, but still looked over stories, provided occasional input, and continued to storyboard for the series on a limited basis.[35][36][37]


In an interview with The A.V. Club, Ward said the show's writing process usually began with the writers telling each other what they had done the previous week to find something humorous to build on. He also said, "A lot of the time, if we're really stuck, we'll start saying everything that comes to our mind, which is usually the worst stuff, and then someone else will think that's terrible but it'll give him a better idea and the ball just starts rolling like that".[40] Because of the busy schedule of writing and coordinating a television series, the writers did not have time to play Dungeons and Dragons, but they still wrote stories they would "want to be playing D&D with".[40] Sometimes, the writers and storyboard artists convened and played writing games.[44] One game that was often used is called exquisite corpse; one writer starts a story on a sheet of paper, and another writer tries to finish it.[44][45] But while a few episodes (such as the fifth-season episode "Puhoy" and the sixth-season episode "Jake the Brick") have been generated using this game,[46][47] Ward has confessed that "the ideas are usually terrible".[45] Former storyboard artist and creative director Cole Sanchez said episode scripts are either created by expanding the good ideas produced by these writing games, or are based on an idea proposed by a storyboard artist in the hope it can be developed into an episode.[44]


While a great majority of the series' episodes were animated by Korean animation studios, Adventure Time occasionally featured guest animators and directors. For instance, the second-season episode "Guardians of Sunshine" was partly rendered in 3-D to emulate the style of a video game.[54] The fifth-season episode "A Glitch is a Glitch" was written and directed by Irish filmmaker and writer David OReilly, and features his distinctive 3-D animation.[56] Animator James Baxter animated select scenes and characters in both the fifth-season episode "James Baxter the Horse" as well as the eighth-season episode "Horse & Ball".[57][58] The sixth-season episode "Food Chain" was written, storyboarded, and directed by Japanese anime director Masaaki Yuasa, and was animated entirely by Yuasa's own studio.[59][60] Another sixth-season episode, "Water Park Prank", features Flash animation by David Ferguson.[61] A stop-motion episode titled "Bad Jubies", directed by Kirsten Lepore, aired near the middle of the show's seventh season.[62][63] Finally, Alex and Lindsay Small-Butera, noted for their web series Baman Piderman, contributed animation to the eighth-season episode "Beyond the Grotto" and the ninth-season episode "Ketchup".[64][65] 041b061a72


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